Isham Family Ancestry
showing descent from
King Edward I of England

 

 

The Isham family descends from King Edward I of England through Vere Leigh, the wife of Sir Justinian Isham I, Vere being 13th in direct descent from Edward's daughter Elizabeth of Rhuddlan, who was born on Aug. 7, 1282 at at Rhuddlan Castle in Denbighshire, Wales. Edward I had five surviving daughters (plus three who died as infants), and Elizabeth was the king's youngest daughter by his first wife Eleanor of Castile (1241-1290), who died when Elizabeth was just a young girl. Elizabeth was also the closest sibling to her younger brother Edward II of England, as they were only two years apart in age.

Edward in April of 1285 negotiated with Floris V, the Count of Holland, to betroth his and Queen Eleanor's two-year old daughter Elizabeth to Floris' new born son and heir John I. As young John was thereafter sent to England to be educated in Edward's court, he and Elizabeth likely grew up together, and they probably knew each other well. Their wedding took place on Jan. 8, 1297 at Ipswich in Suffolk, just a few months after John had inherited the County of Holland, following the murder of his father. Though Elizabeth was just fourteen-years old at the time, and her new husband only twelve, she was expected to accompany him back to Holland, which she refused to do. Edward was well known for his fierce temper, and this incident may very well have aroused his wrath. Interestingly, a bill exists in the Tower of London from an Adam of Shoreditch, goldsmith to Edward I, for a great ruby and a great emerald to replace two stones in the coronet of Edward's daughter, the original stones being lost "when the King [in a presumed outburst] cast the same coronet into the fire, at Ipswich, in the beginning of the month of January [during either the 24th or 25th year of the King's reign]" (Botfield, 1841, Manners and Household Expenses of England in the Thirteenth and Fifteenth Centuries, p. lxxvi-lxxvii).

It was subsequently decided that Elizabeth would indeed follow her husband to Holland, and her father delivered her there personally. They travelled across the Netherlands before arriving in Ghent, Belgium where they stayed for a few months, spending Christmas with Elizabeth's older sisters Eleanor and Margaret, who had married Belgian nobles. John and Elizabeth's marriage was brief, possibly never consumated, and ended on Nov. 10, 1299, when John died of dysentery, though there were rumours of his murder. No children were born from their brief union. When Elizabeth arrived back in England, she met her new stepmother Margaret of France, whom her father Edward had married while Elizabeth was in Holland. Margaret, at 20-years old, was some 40 years younger than the 60-year old king, which made her only three or so years older than Elizabeth, and the two young women are said to have become great friends, who were virtually inseparable.

Present at Elizabeth's wedding in Ipswich was Humphrey de Bohun, the future Earl of Hereford, and this Humphrey on Nov. 14, 1302 became Elisabeth's second husband in an elaborate wedding at Westminster Cathedral. Humphrey apparently was something of a dandy, who loved jousting in tournaments. He in fact is said to have run off in the latter part of 1306 from a military campaign that the King was leading in Scotland, when Humphrey, Piers Gaveston, and twenty other young lords became "bored" with camp life, and left to join a jousting tornament. The king, who was known for his fierce temper, was furious and ordered the arrest of the deserters. However, the King's young wife, Margaret of France, who was very close to Elizabeth, succeeded in convincing Edward to pardon the errant knights. This act may very well have saved Sir Humphrey's life, and spared Elizabeth from her father's wrath (Hamilton, 1988, Piers Gaveston, etc., p. 33-34).

Sir Humphrey was well-educated, collected books, and he loved his wife. They had several children in the 13 years that they were married. Then Elizabeth, aged 33 years in May of 1316,and pregnant with their tenth or eleventh child, went into labour, giving birth to a daughter Isabella de Bohun. Tragically, both mother and daughter died within a few days on May 5, 1316 at Quendon in Essex, and both were interred nearby at Walden Abbey in the village of Saffron Walden. Humphrey became gloomy and introspective following Elizabeth's death. Though once a close friend and jousting comrade to his brother-in-law Prince Edward II, the son of Edward I, Humphrey ardently supported the Magna Carta, which guarenteed the freedoms of the nobility. This brought him into conflict with the younger Edward, after the latter in 1307 succeeded to his father's throne, and began to defy the Magna Carta protections. When civil war broke out between Edward and some of his barons, Humphrey took up arms against the king. He was killed fighting Edward's forces in 1322, while crossing a wooden bridge at the Battle of Boroughbridge in Yorkshire. Historian Ian Mortimer writes that, "[Sir Humphrey of] Hereford led the fight on the bridge, but he and his men were caught in the arrow fire. Then one of de Harclay's pikemen, concealed beneath the bridge, thrust [his pike] upwards between the planks and skewered the Earl of Hereford through the anus, twisting the head of the iron pike into his intestines. His dying screams turned the advance into a panic." (Mortimer, 2003, The Greatest Traitor, p. 124).

 


The likely tomb of Elizabeth of Rhuddlan at Walden Abbey

 

  1. Edward I (1239-1307), King of England, the son of Henry III of England, and a descendant of Charlemagne;
    b. June 17, 1239 at Westminster Palace;
    m. Nov. 1, 1254 at Monastery of Las Huelgas in Burgos, Spain to Eleanor of Castille (1241-1290),
    dau. of King Ferdinand III of Castille;
    d. July 7, 1307 on campaign at Burgh-by-Sands, Cumbria, England.
    Buried in Westminster Abbey. Wikipedia article

  2. Elizabeth Rhuddlan (1282-1316), widow of John, Earl of Holland & dau. of above;
    b. c.Aug. 7, 1282 at Rhuddlan Castle, Denbighshire, Wales;
    m. Nov. 14, 1302 at Westminster Abbey to Humphrey de Bohun (1276-1322), 4th Earl of Hereford.
        Also Earl of Essex, and Lord High Constable to the King, which meant he carried the King's standard into battle.
    d. May 5, 1316 (in childbirth) at Quendon, Essex.
    Her tomb is at Walden Abbey in Essex.
    Her husband subsequently died at the battle of Boroughbridge in Yorkshire, and is buried in Blackfriers Abbey.
      There is also a cenotaph for Humphrey de Bohun at Hereford Cathedral. Wikipedia article Connected Bloodlines article

  3. William de Bohun (c.1311-1360), 1st Earl of Northampton, Knight of the Garter, son of above;
    b. c. 1310-1312 at Quendon, Essex;
    m. 1335 to Elizabeth de Badlesmere (1313-1356), dau. of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, and widow of Edward Mortimer;
    d. 1360 at ______________;
    William was renowned as both a warrior and a diplomat. He is buried at Walden Abbey, Essex. Wikipedia article

  4. Elizabeth de Bohun (c.1350-1385), Countess of Arundel & Surrey, dau. of above;
    b. c. 1350 at Hereford, Hertfordshire;
    m. Sept. 28, 1359 to Richard Fitz-Alan, 4th Earl of Arundel & Surrey (1346-1397);
    d. April 3, 1385 at ___________________;
    She is buried at Lewes Priory in East Sussex. Wikipedia article

  5. Elizabeth Fitz-Alan (1366-1425), Duchess of Norfolk, dau. of above;
    b. 1366 in Derbyshire;
    m. bef. Aug. 18, 1401 to Sir Robert Goushill (Gousell) of Hoveringham, her 3rd husband;
    d. July 8, 1425 at Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire;
    Both are buried in the parish church of St. Michael of Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire.
    Elizabeth on her father's side also descends from Henry III and Eleanor of Provence in Lineage II. Wikipedia article

  6. Joan (Jean) Goushill (Gousell) (c.1409-c.1458), dau. and co-heir of above;
    b. c.1409 at Hoverington, Nottinghamshire;
    m. bef. 1435 to Thomas Stanley (1405-1459), 1st Baron Stanley, King of Mann;
    d. c.1458 at Lathom & Knowlesly, Lancashire. House Empire article
    She is buried at Burscough Priory in Lancashire.

  7. Sir William Stanley (c.1435-1495), Knight of the Garter & son of above;
    b. c 1435 in Lytham, Lancashire;
    m. c.1471 to Elizabeth Hopton (1427-1498), his 2nd wife and dau. of Thomas Hopton;
    d. Feb. 10, 1495 at the Tower of London.
    He was beheaded for treason by order of Henry VII. Wikipedia article
    He is buried at the Syon Monastery in London.

  8. Jane Stanley (1463-1525), dau. of above;
    b. 1463 at Holt, Flintshire, Wales;
    m. ___________ to Sir John Warburton (1459-1524) of Warburton and Arley.
    d. 1525 at ______________;

  9. Sir Piers (Peter) Warburton (1504-1551) of Warburton and Arley, and son of above;
    b. 1504 at Arley, Cheshire;
    m. ______________ to Elizabeth Winnington (1501-1558), dau. and heiress of Richard Winnington (Wynynton);
    d. June 5, 1551 at ______________.

  10. Jane Warburton (?-1591), eldest dau. of above;
    b. __________ at ______________;
    m. _________ to Sir William Brereton (c.1520-1559), Member of Parliament for Cheshire;
    d. June 1591 at ______________.
    Buried at Middlewich, Cheshire. Her husband is buried at St. Oswald Church in Brereton, Cheshire.

  11. Elizabeth Brereton (c.1551-1631), dau. of above;
    b. c.1551 at Brereton, Cheshire;
    m. 1568 to Thomas Venables (c.1543-1606), Baron of Kinderton, Sheriff of Cheshire (1592);
    d. Oct. 1, 1631 at Brereton, Cheshire.
    She is buried in the Venables Chapel at St. Michael and All Angels Church in Brereton, Cheshire.

  12. Elizabeth Venables (?-?), dau. of above
    b. __________ at Kinderton, Cheshire;
    m. c.1591 to Sir Thomas Egerton (1574-1599), eldest son of Thomas Egerton, 1st Viscount Brackley;
    d. __________ at ______________.
    Sir Thomas was slain by rebels in Ireland. He died Aug. 23, 1599, and is buried at St. Mary Church in Dodleston, Cheshire.
    Elizabeth on her father's side also descends from Henry III and Eleanor of Provence in Lineage II.
    She is buried at St. Michael & All Angels Church in Staffordshire.

  13. Mary Egerton (?-1669), dau. of above;
    b. __________ at ______________;
    m. Nov. 11 1610 to Thomas Leigh (1595-1672), 1st Baron Leigh of Stoneleigh;
    bur. March 21, 1669 at Stoneleigh, Warwickshire.

  14. Vere Leigh (?-1704), dau. of above;
    b. __________ at ______________;
    m. 1653 to Sir Justinian Isham (1610-1675), 2nd Baronet of Lamport;
    d. Oct. 29, 1704 at ______________;
    Sir Justinian is buried in the chancel of All Saints Church in Lamport. Presumably Vere is there with him.
     
    This lineage continues as Generation VI in the Isham Family Ancestry.
    An alternate line of descent of Vere Leigh from Henry III (father of Edward I) is shown in lineage II below.

 

(The main authority for this lineage is the pedigree of
Sir Charles Edmund Isham by John Bernard Burke, 1858)

 

 

 

 

 



 

Lineage II

(an alternate line of descent from Henry III, the father of Edward I in Lineage I)

Henry III (1207-1272), King of England;
b. Oct.1, 1207 at Winchester Castle, England;
m. Jan. 14, 1236, Canterbury Cathedral to Eleanor of Provence (1223-1291), dau. of Ramon Berenguer V, Count of Provence ;
d. Nov. 16, 1272 at _______________. Wikipedia article
Buried at Westminster Abbey.

  • Edward I "Longshanks" (1239-1307), King of England, who continues as Generation I in Lineage I above.
  • Edmund "Crouchback" (1245-1296), Earl of Lancaster, who follows below.
  1. Edmund Crouchback (1245-1296), 1st Earl of Lancaster, son of Henry III above;
    b. Jan. 16, 1245 in London, England;
    m. Feb. 3, 1276 in Paris to Blanche d'Artois (c.1248-1300), dau. of Robert I of Artois;
    d. June 5, 1296 at the siege of Bordeaux.
    Blanche is also the grandaughter of Louis VIII of France and Blanche of Castile.
    Edmund is buried at Westminster Abbey. Wikipedia article

  2. Henry Plantagenet (1281-1345), 3rd Earl of Lancaster, son of above;
    b. c.1281 at Winchester Castle, England;
    m. c.1296 to Mathilda (Maud) de Chaworth (1282-1322), only child of Patrick de Chaworth;
    d. Sept. 22, 1385 at _______________. Wikipedia article

  3. Eleanor Plantagent of Lancaster (1318-1372), Countess of Arundel, dau. of above;
    b. Sept. 11, 1318 at _______________;
    m. (second) Feb. 5 1344 at Ditton Church, Stoke Poges, Buckinghamshire to Richard "Copped Hat" Fitz-Alan (1307-1376), 10th Earl of Arundel;
    d. Jan. 11, 1372 at Arundel, West Sussex.
    Buried at Lewes Priory in Lewes, Sussex. Wikipedia article

  4. Richard Fitz-Alan (1346-1397), 4th Earl of Arundel & Surrey, son of above;
    b. 1346 at _______________;
    m. Sept. 28, 1359 to Elizabeth de Bohun (c.1350-1385), Countess of Arundel & Surrey;
    d. Sept. 21, 1397 at Westminster (London).
    Stood trial at Westminster and was beheaded for treason against King Richard II.
    Buried in the church of the Augustin Friars, Bread Street, London. Wikipedia article

  5.  

  6. Elizabeth Fitz-Alan (1366-1425), Duchess of Norfolk, dau. of the above Richard Fitz-Alan;
    b. 1366 in Derbyshire;
    m. bef. Aug. 18, 1401 to Sir Robert Goushill (Gousell) of Hoveringham, her 3rd husband;
    d. July 8, 1425 at Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire;
    Both are buried in the parish church of Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire. Wikipedia article
    Elizabeth on her mother's side also descends from Edward I and Eleanor of Castille in Lineage I.

  7. Joan (Jean) Goushill (Gousell) (c.1409-c.1458), dau. and co-heir of above;
    b. c.1409 at Hoverington, Nottinghamshire;
    m. bef. 1435 to Thomas Stanley (1405-1459), 1st Baron Stanley, King of Mann;
    d. c.1458 at Lathom & Knowlesly, Lancashire. House Empire article

  8.  

  9. John Stanley (d. bef. 1485) of Weaver, son of the above Joan Goushill;
    b. _____________ at _____________________;
    m. _____________ to Elizabeth Weaver, dau. of Sir Thomas Weaver;
    d. bef. 1485 at _____________________;

  10. Cicely Stanley (d. 1514), dau. of above;
    b. _____________ at _____________________;
    m. _____________ to Thomas Venbles (d. 1513) of Golborne and Kinderton;
    d. 1514 at _____________________;

  11. William Venables (d. 1544) of Kinderton, son of above;
    b. _____________ at _____________________;
    m. _____________ to Elinor Cotton, dau. of Sir Richard Cotton (1461-1503), of Hamstall-Ridware;
    d. July 1544 at _____________________;

  12. Thomas Venables (d. 1580) of Kinderton, son of above;
    b. _____________ at _____________________;
    m. _____________ to Maud Needham, dau. of Robert Needham (d. 1556) and Agnes Mainwaring (d. 1560);
    d. July 1580 at _____________________;
    Maud Needham also descends from William the Conqueror through her mother's side of the family, the Lords of Mainwaring of Over Peover.
    Amicia de Meschines, wife of Sir Ralph Mainwaring, is the grandaughter of Maud of Gloucester (d. 1189), grandaughter of Henry I of England.

  13. Thomas Venables (c.1543-1606), son of above, Baron of Kinderton, Sheriff of Cheshire (1592);
    b. _____________ at _____________________;
    m. _____________ to Mary Brereton (c.1651-1631), dau. Sir William Brereton (c.1520-1559), Member of Parliament for Cheshire;
    d. Dec. 8, 1606 at _____________________;

  14. Elizabeth Venables (?-?), dau. of above
    b. __________ at Kinderton, Cheshire;
    m. c.1591 to Sir Thomas Egerton (1574-1599), eldest son of Thomas Egerton, 1st Viscount Brackley;
    d. __________ at ______________.
    Sir Thomas was slain by rebels in Ireland. He died Aug. 23, 1599, and is buried at Dodleston, Cheshire.
    Elizabeth on her mother's side also descends from Edward I and Eleanor of Castille in Lineage I.

  15. Mary Egerton (?-1669), dau. of above;
    b. __________ at ______________;
    m. Nov. 11 1610 to Thomas Leigh (1595-1672), 1st Baron Leigh of Stoneleigh;
    bur. March 21, 1669 at Stoneleigh, Warwickshire.

  16. Vere Leigh (?-1704), dau. of above;
    b. __________ at ______________;
    m. 1653 to Sir Justinian Isham (1610-1675), 2nd Baronet of Lamport;
    d. Oct. 29, 1704 at ______________;
    Sir Justinian is buried in the chancel of Lamport Church. Presumably Vere is there with him.

 


 
Vere Leigh is 14th in direct descent from King Edward I of England.
The above [Button] is a link that continues the line of descent
from Vere down to the Baronets of Lamport.

 

 

 

 

 



 

REFERENCES

 

 

 

 

 



Copyright © Michael S. Clark, Ph.D., 1998- - All rights reserved.